Viewing The International Space Staion

March 8th, 2011 at 10:27 pm by under Uncategorized, Weather

A big thank you to Kathy Barnstorff from NASA Langley.  She was kind enough to send out the following e-mail regarding the viewing of the ISS. Our weather forecast is quite a bit more active for the next few days (Thursday rain!), so I don’t really have time to dedicate toward ISS viewing. Directly below is the copy of the e-mail from Kathy at NASA Langley:

Note: The space shuttle Discovery just undocked from the ISS on Monday morning after delivery supplies and a new module. It’s scheduled to land Wednesday around noon. What that means here is we have a good chance to see Discovery along with the ISS in the below sightings Monday and Tuesday nights. So look for TWO objects flying overhead during the times listed below.
Hi all,
An update on seeing the International Space Station (ISS) the next few days. As always, look for a dark location with minimal ambient light, and with as clear a view of as much of the sky as possible.
Remember, the smaller the Magnitude number, the brighter the ISS will appear (3 is brighter than 5, -1 is brighter than 1). I list only those opportunities with relatively bright magnitudes and high elevations (listed as altitude on the following link).

For more information, visit
http://www.heavens-above.com/main.asp?lat=37.025&lng=-76.3417&loc=Hampton&TZ=EST <blocked::http://www.heavens-above.com/main.asp?lat=37.025&lng=-76.3417&loc=Hampton&TZ=EST>
- this gives you the information for Hampton, VA – you can change your location on this page if necessary.

Enjoy!

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Remember to also look for the shuttle at this time!
Tuesday March 8 (Mag -3.7): Start 7:24pm in NW; pass to NE at 75 degrees elevation at 7:27pm; enter Earth’s shadow in E at 64 degrees elevation at 7:27pm.
(Hints: Go outside and face NW – the Moon and Jupiter will be in front of you to your left, and the Big Dipper will be directly to  your right. The ISS will appear in front of you, rise nearly straight up and pass just slightly to the right of overhead, and soon after passing overhead entering the Earth’s shadow and rapidly fading from view)
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Note that tonight you can see two simultaneous passes – see the two following sightings.
Wednesday March 9 (Mag -2.2): Start 6:15pm in NNW; pass to NNE at 24 degrees elevation at 6:18pm; end in E at 6:20pm.
(Hints: Go outside and face N – the Moon will directly to your left, with Jupiter and Mercury visible directly to your left just above the horizon, and the Big Dipper in front of you and to your right. The ISS will appear  to your left in front of you, cross left to right in front of you through the Big Dipper on its way to passing over the horizon to your right)
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See the second of two simultaneous passes of the ISS as it completely orbits the Earth in a little over an hour and a half!
Wednesday March 9 (Mag -1.6): Start 7:50pm in WNW; enter Earth’s shadow in SW at 24 degrees elevation at 7:53pm.
(Hints: Go outside and face W – the Moon will be directly in front of you, with the Big Dipper behind you over your right shoulder. The ISS will appear  to your right in front of you, cross right to left in front of you while passing underneath the Moon, entering the Earth’s shadow and rapidly fading from view in front of you to your left)
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Thursday March 10 (Mag -3.7): Start 6:41pm in NW; pass to NE at 87 degrees elevation at 6:44pm; end in SE at 6:47pm.
(Hints: Go outside and face NW – the Moon and Jupiter will be in front of you to your left, and the Big Dipper will be directly to  your right. The ISS will appear in front of you, rise nearly straight up and pass just slightly to the right of overhead, Go outside and face NW – the Moon will be high behind you, Jupiter will be directly to your left, and the Big Dipper will be on the horizon to  your right. The ISS will appear in front of you, rise up and to your right, passing overhead high and to your right, continuing behind you to the horizon)
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Friday March 11 (Mag -1.2): Start 7:07pm in W; pass to SW at 21 degrees elevation at 7:10pm; end in S at 7:12pm.
(Hints: Go outside and face SW – the Moon will be high just over your left shoulder, with Jupiter directly in front of you. The ISS will appear  to your right in front of you, cross right to left in front of you passing below Jupiter on its way to passing over the horizon in front of you to your left)
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2 Responses to “Viewing The International Space Staion”

  1. samla sawyer says:

    i loved looking for the space station and discovery. how cool. i would also like to suggest teaching the viewers how to pick out consellations. my favorite book is “the glow sky book” by illuminations. it uses the outlines of the characters to help amateurs. please have a regular sky viewing segment with maybe 8pm sightings. encourage use of a compass. thanks for listening to my suggestion.

  2. Bob Allen says:

    The NASA SkyWatch 2.0 applet tracks International Space Station and Space Shuttle viewing opportunities for cities around the world. Here’s the URL — http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/index.html

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